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Esri Canada Celebrates 30 Years of Geographic Innovation

Esri Canada marks 30 years of operations this year with a continued commitment to provide innovative enterprise geographic information system (GIS) solutions based on Esri’s ArcGIS platform. ArcGIS has evolved from a niche technology for mapping professionals into an open, pervasive Web GIS platform that everyone can use. It runs in the cloud, on enterprise servers or both computing environments, enabling users to easily mash up basemaps and data into intelligent Web maps that can be shared within and outside their organization.arcinfo

“Over the past 30 years, GIS has become far easier to use and can now be deployed in the cloud and accessed on mobile devices,” notes Alex Miller, president and founder, Esri Canada. “The technology has also advanced to incorporate real-time data collection and analysis, providing a common operational picture to entire organizations. These developments make it easier for people to use and share maps, data and analytical tools to make informed, collaborative decisions. While access to the technology has changed, one thing remains the same: GIS continues to enable users to solve problems in new ways.”

Esri Canada Celebrates 30 Years of Geographic Innovation

Alex Miller founded Esri Canada in 1984. From a small office in Toronto with six employees, the company has grown into a multi-million dollar business that employs more than 330 staff in 16 locations across Canada. Its customer base of more than 10,000 organizations has expanded from its initial wins in the forestry and agriculture sectors to all industries including government, business and education.  This significant growth is testament to the company’s unique ability in applying mapping and analysis to nearly every concern. In 2010, for advancing the use of GIS technology in numerous industries across Canada, the company received the Ontario Business Achievement Award for Innovation in 2010.

Increasing government efficiency and transparency Alex Miller - Esri CanadaEsri Canada began its foray into the municipal sector in 1985, when it developed the County of Oxford’s Land Related Information System to support land-use planning. The system integrates and provides access to information such as property and infrastructure data from various government systems. It received the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA) Exemplary Systems in Government Award in 1988 and became a model for Canadian municipalities. Today, Esri’s ArcGIS platform is the GIS standard in all levels of government.

To help local governments deploy GIS quickly, Esri Canada provides ArcGIS for Canadian Municipalities. This series of free app templates helps improve transparency, increase citizen engagement and reduce the costs of disseminating information such as election results and government services. In 2010, the company launched the Esri Canada Community Maps Program, which is succeeding in building a detailed, national Web basemap for Canada using authoritative data contributed by government organizations across the country. The basemap is free for governments and the public to use, and speeds up the creation of mapping apps.

The company also developed the Esri Canada Automated Vehicle Location (AVL) solution that enables real-time tracking of fleet vehicles. The hosted solution improves the safety and productivity of municipal field operations including snow removal, tree pruning, roadside mowing and road repairs. As well, Esri Canada recently introduced Assessment Analyst, which allows assessors to incorporate various data and 3D modeling into their analysis to increase the accuracy of property valuations. These pioneering solutions are helping to revolutionize government processes and create new opportunities for increasing efficiencies and revenues for customers.

Improving business productivity ESRI ArcGIS 10
J.D. Irving in New Brunswick was the first forestry company in North America to use Esri technology for the sustainable management of forests back in 1983. They consolidated numerous GIS apps and datasets across 10 regional offices into a single enterprise GIS in 2010. In addition to centrally managing their forestry operations for watercourse buffers, habitat and growing forests, the system now supports their other business areas including transportation, shipbuilding, retail and agriculture.

Today, Esri technology is used by banks, insurers, real estate developers, manufacturers, airports and hospitals to improve productivity, manage risk and effectively deliver products and services. Esri Canada offers the Esri Business Analyst (Canadian Edition), which enables organizations to use location analytics with demographic and business data to gain a deeper understanding of their customers, competition, market and trends. To make it even easier for business users to incorporate GIS into their daily workflows, the company also provides Esri Maps for Location Analytics. These solutions integrate mapping and analytical tools directly into popular systems for business intelligence (IBM Cognos, SAP BusinessObjects and MicroStrategy), customer relationship management (Dynamics CRM and Salesforce), and productivity and collaboration (Microsoft Office and SharePoint).

Advancing geographic education
Esri CanadaSince 1997, Esri Canada has offered education programs that provide affordable access to GIS technology to publicly-funded Canadian schools from kindergarten to grade 12, as well as universities and colleges. It recently introduced a GIS in Education Grant Program, which awards software and training grants to five K-12 schools every year to expand the use of GIS in the classroom. The company also develops free teaching resources that help educators incorporate GIS courses into their curriculum and enhance students’ critical thinking skills.

To promote the pursuit of GIS careers, Esri Canada awards more than $2 million in cash, software and training grants annually to students in more than 50 Canadian universities and colleges through its GIS Scholarships Program. The company also provides outstanding undergraduate and graduate GIS students with an opportunity to jumpstart their career through the Associate GIS Professional Program. Students are given a 12-month, full-time paid position at Esri Canada where they gain cross-functional experience in areas including professional services, training and technical support.

Building up the community and the environment

“The innovative culture and entrepreneurial spirit we’ve fostered among our staff, as well as the partnerships we’ve built, have allowed us to grow our company and industry over the past 30 years,” continues Mr. Miller. “Whether it’s enabling open government, identifying the best site for a new facility or improving education through interactive learning, our goal is to continue providing solutions that make a positive impact on society.”

To celebrate its 30th anniversary, the spring issue of ArcNorth News, Esri Canada’s customer magazine, will focus on the company’s three decades of success. Customers and partners are also invited to celebrate with the company at the 2014 Esri Canada User Conferences, which will be held in 16 Canadian cities throughout the year.

Esri Canada logo

About Esri Canada

Founded in 1984, Esri Canada provides enterprise geographic information system (GIS) solutions that empower businesses, governments and educational institutions to make timely, informed and mission-critical decisions by leveraging the power of geography.  The company distributes the world’s leading GIS software from Esri, Schneider Electric, Cityworks – Azteca Systems, Inc. and other technology partners.  Headquartered in Toronto, the company serves over 10,000 customers from 16 regional offices across Canada.  Esri Canada has joined the elite rank of Canada’s Best Managed companies and has been named to the Branham300.  Information about the company can be found at esri.ca.

 

Electrical Safety Authority chooses DMTI Spatial solutions

Electrical Safety Authority chooses DMTI Spatial solutions to enhance service delivery with location based solutions

ESA uses DMTI ‘s Location Hub technology to power an online contractor selection tool ,that locates licensed electrical contractors in Ontario, and to support its call centre in the scheduling and assigning of inspectors 

TORONTO – September 19, 2013– DMTI Spatial Inc. (DMTI), Canada’s leading provider of Location Intelligence solutions, today announced a multi-year agreement with the Electrical Safety Authority (ESA).

ESA will continue to use DMTI’s Location Hub to power an online tool that uses location data to help users find local licensed electrical contractors. In addition, DMTI’s services will be used to support ESA call centre operations resulting in an enhanced measure of customer service overall.DMTI Spatial

“It is critical that ESA provide public access to licensed electrical contractors, and that ESA inspectors can easily locate work sites,” said Bohdan Baluta, Director of Information Technology at Electrical Safety Authority. “DMTI helps us do this with accurate, location-based solutions that   offer consumers a choice of licensed contractors, and allow inspectors to plan routes that will maximize the number of inspections they are able to perform.”

DMTI developed a custom front-end for its Location Hub solution, enabling the public to search for licensed electrical contractors in the right community. For those Ontarians without internet access — including anyone experiencing an electrical failure — ESA’s call centre can provide the information over the phone. DMTI also designed and built a mapping interface for ESA’s call centre application so that call centre representatives can now assign inspectors according to location. The system uses GPS coordinates (longitude and latitude) which are passed to ESA’s internal SAP system to schedule inspectors, who ensure the work completed by the electrical contractors adheres to the standards as prescribed by the Ontario Electric Safety Code (OESC).

“DMTI has helped ESA enhance their customer service through improved capabilities and more efficient use of personnel,” said Phil Kaszuba, Vice President and General Manager at DMTI Spatial.

Location Hub Portal is a SaaS-based service that validates and corrects Canadian addresses for complete accuracy. It also assigns geographic coordinates to allow addresses to be placed on a map with high precision. The service reviews and compares users’ uploaded proprietary address data against DMTI’s comprehensive national database.

ABOUT DMTI

DMTI has been providing industry leading enterprise Location Intelligence solutions for more than a decade to Global 2000 companies and government agencies.  DMTI’s world-class Location Hub platform uniquely identifies, validates and maintains a universe of location-based data.  DMTI is the creator of market leading Mapping Solutions and maintains the gold standard for GIS location-based data in Canada.

 ABOUT Electrical Safety Authority

The Electrical Safety Authority’s (ESA) role is to enhance public electrical safety in Ontario. As a delegated administrative authority acting on behalf of the Government of Ontario, ESA is responsible for administering specific regulations related to the Ontario Electrical Safety Code, the licensing of Electrical Contractors and Master Electricians, electricity distribution system safety, and electrical product safety. ESA works extensively with stakeholders throughout the province on education, training and promotion to foster electrical safety across the province. More information on the Electrical Safety Authority can be found on its website, www.esasafe.com, through Twitter @HomeandSafety and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ElectricalSafetyAuthority

 

Historic Bird’s Eye Views of several Canadian Cities

historic aerial image  of Halifax

Canada is certainly not an old country when compared to many others like France or the UK but it has been around long enough to have some very interesting history.

Here are some historic aerial images of major cities in Canada. It is interesting when you compare some of these with modern maps and aerial images, as then you can get a real appreciation on what urban sprawl looks like and how cities develop and spread over time.

The Association of Canadian Map Libraries and Archives (ACMLA) provide a service where you can obtain your own colour printed reproduction of any of the listed images below [note: the images that the links below point to are actually only thumbnails of the actual images that they repoduce]. Maps ordered are printed on acid free 70 lb paper with a size of about 55 X 70 cm. For more information about how to order historic map prints go to the ACMLA site

historic aerial image  of Ottawa 1893

 

Calgary, Alberta [1910]
Dawson City [1903]
Halifax, Nova Scotia [1879]
Hamilton, Ontario [1894]
London, Ontario [1872]
Montréal, Québec [1889]
Ottawa, Ontario [1876]
Ottawa, Ontario [1893]
Québec City, Québec [1905]
St. John’s, Newfoundland [1879]
Toronto, Ontario [1876]
Vancouver, British Columbia [1898]
Waterloo, Ontario [189?]
Winnipeg, Manitoba [1881]

Also remember to check back to the new Historic Cartography section as more content is added weekly.

 

[image source: acmla.org]

SMART (Spatial Mapping Academic Research Tools) Program

DMTI Spatial Supports Canadian Academia with SMART Program

For more than a decade, DMTI Spatial Inc. (DMTI) has been supporting Canada’s academic GIS community with the SMART (Spatial Mapping Academic Research Tools) program. The program assists a consortium of libraries at over forty Canadian universities and colleges, including the University of Toronto, York University and the University of British Columbia, reaching over 9000 students and faculty members annually.

The aim of the SMART program is to provide affordable access to data in support of social science, engineering, research, business and environmental geographic educational programs. Because of this program, Canada’s GIS students are able to work with many more hands-on, real-world examples, and be better prepared for their life after their post-secondary education is complete. The SMART program has helped individuals at member institutions with such impactful projects as determining emergency routes and plotting the best locations for hospitals and new energy sources. DMTI has lent continued support by providing licenses for its data products, including its CanMap® suite, to these institutions to use for teaching and research purposes.

“The SMART program really opened the door for academics wishing to use Canadian spatial data,” said Marcel A.J. Fortin, GIS and Map Librarian, Map and Data Library, University of Toronto. Mr. Fortin manages the program and plays an instrumental role in supporting the consortium of participating institutions. “Prior to the SMART program, there were few opportunities for university students and faculty to use quality Canadian mapping data for research and teaching. DMTI’s data is now very prevalent at SMART program institutions, being utilized in everything from first year lectures to more complex projects like advanced geocoding and the creation of 3D elevation models.”

“It was very generous of DMTI Spatial Inc. to provide Canadian academic institutions a suite of vector data, DEM, imagery and geocoding software through the SMART Program, especially at a time when geospatial data was not readily available or affordable,” said Trudy Bodak, Librarian Emeritus, York University. “At York University, the data was heavily used by graduate and undergraduate students for a variety of projects including plotting emergency routes, travel times and bicycle routes, and determining the best locations for new golf courses, hospitals and wind turbines. I always used this data as an example in my GIS Library instruction classes, because there is so much value and flexibility in using it for research analysis.”

Academia from coast to coast now continue to benefit from DMTI Spatial and their efforts to liberate access to Canadian GIS data.

Avoid the Traffic with ReRouteMe Mapping Application

One of the things that I have been fortunate enough to avoid since moving east back to the Maritimes a few years ago has been the annoying daily commute that so much of us participate in at least twice a day (although I have had my share of it over the years, having lived in many urban areas such as Halifax, Ottawa and Toronto). Statistics Canada reports that the average time that Canadians spend commuting to and from work increased from an average of 54 minutes in 1992 to an average of 63 minutes in 2005. If you tally those minutes up you may be shocked to learn that it works out to almost 32 days a year that an average person spends in traffic commuting.

traffic along the highway“For one in four Canadians, the two-way commute takes more than 90 minutes.And it’s not just the commute. There is nearly as much traffic at lunchtime today as there was at rush hour a generation ago. Not only are there more cars and trucks on the road but we’re using them for more things: driving the kids to sports, where once they would have walked.” (Andrew Coyne – Macleans Magazine – Jan 2011).

So are you tired of the traffic and want to travel faster and smarter?

Then perhaps you should check to see if your city is available on ReRouteMe.

ReRouteMe logo

This online mapping application takes the basic functionality of Google maps (such as the display of the reference map and the address search ability) and combines it with custom functionality and databases that are completely independent from Google to provide a powerful value added product that can help you avoid accidents, traffic cams, construction and any congestion on your everyday commute. The ReRouteMe back-end, powered by Open Source software packages has been further customized to meet the application requirements and public demand. ReRouteMe uses PostgreSQL as the RDBMS for the geographic/tabular data management as well as processing and the routing engine is based on a modified version of pgRouting.

Designed with a Wide Range of Users in Mind

ReRouteMe has been designed for a wide range of users including those that drive their own vehicle, use public transit, take a taxi, cycle and even walking. Currently it provides over 35 different cities (mostly from Ontario), a growing collection that continues to increase since the first time I discovered the application in 2012. It provides users with the basics such as simply going from start to final destination as well as the ability to customize with multiple stops, stop-over times and the ability to set other various dynamic criteria to help influence the provided route. Users can sign up for an account, define and store their routes, and then the application will notify them via e-mail with alternative options when there are last minute events such as accidents, traffic jams or road closures.

ReRouteMe Web Mapping Application

The web site contains plenty of helpful extras that makes it stand out and appealing to a large audience, however I was fortunate enough to get some additional information from Pierre Lermusieaux, the COO of Rhexia Incorporated (creators of ReRouteMe) to share with the CanadianGIS.com audience.

“The ReRouteMe web application was built out of an interest to provide more in-depth and local information about commuting that what is typically available from Google and others. Our focus is the promotion of ‘green’ modes of transportation as well as the presentation of useful information related to public transportation. The ReRouteMe application is free to use by anyone.

The application has been designed to leverage publicly available data that is typically further processed to make it useable and informative. The road network used for the routing is based on OpenStreetMap, the National Road Network (NRN) from NRCan, and the Ontario Road Network (ORN) from LIO. Additional efforts have been invested to add missing information or correct existing one. All of the point of interest have been harvested from public information provided by cities or other organizations.” – (Pierre Lermusieaux – Rhexia Incorporated)

Some of the functionality currently presented in the ReRouteMe application include:

  • Public Transit Routing (based on the Municipal GTFS schedules with advanced options for routing), coverage includes the following municipalities: Ottawa, Toronto, Mississauga, Waterloo, Guelph and Hamilton. They have also deployed GoTransit which links the Greater Toronto Area, thus allowing them to route the user across various municipalities in the GTA using public transit. Soon users will also be able to do ‘simulation’ routing with the future Ottawa Light Rail that includes allowing the user to transfer between Octranspo buses and the soon to be built Ottawa Light Rail.
  • Routing for Bicycles that merges cycle paths with the road network with some advanced options
  • Routing for pedestrians
  • Routing for Personal vehicle, including multiple stops and advanced options for routing
  • Routing for Taxi that provides cost estimate for the trip as well as trip share for multiple riders
  • Ability to change the City of interest that will intern drive the selection of the Transit organizations, weather information, gas prices, traffic news, and taxi fares that are included with the routing and map
  • Routing is influenced by factors representing: rush vs non-rush hour, dynamic and recurring congestion, turn costs, turn prohibitions, constructions, events, and accidents
  • Calculations of the costs associated to using a Car for a specific route: gas usage and costs based on a specific car make and model (selectable) and current average gas prices for the area, CO2 emitted for the route
  • Provision of an estimated travel time for the route and another one taking into account the local current weather conditions
  • Ability to reverse and edit the route addresses and to apply the same route addresses to another mode of transportation
  • Saving routes, one time routes, recurring routes and the ability to send them via e-mail
  • Ability to set your own preferences (needs to be logged in): preferred addresses, home city, car make and model, notification frequency, etc.
  • Once a route is saved and it is recurring, the application will notify you by e-mail of any changes to the itinerary prior to your departure should construction or accidents impact it. A new route is then proposed as part of the notification
  • Ability to show points of interest at a maximum distance along the calculated route
  • Ability to dynamically exclude a segment from a route
  • Find out where the traffic cameras are located to help avoid any tickets
  • Learn where the best place is to buy gas

cars at sunset on the highway in trafficI am sure that by now you can see the from this extensive list of current functionality that the ReRouteMe web mapping application can provide people with robust tools to help them plan their daily commute and learn of any changes that they should anticipate before they head out. So if you have a rather complicated daily commute then I am sure that you can see that a few minutes on ReRouteMe.com before you head out can actually save you time later on.

The team at ReRouteMe that I have been in contact with are very proud of their application and  tell me that they will expand the tool whenever there comes a need or demand for certain services and thus would love any feedback or suggestions for future modifications.

Below are a few more helpful videos on ReRouteMe that show how robust and powerful the tool is; and yet how user friendly and easy to use it is. I recommend that you check it out for yourself (especially if you live in an urban are of Ontario) and let me know what you think, all feedback is welcome. The web site is ReRouteMe.com
as well as being very easy to use with plenty of helpful information including help videos.

Website: ReRouteMe.com

[Sources: emails – rerouteme.com – macleans.ca – rhexia.com]
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Geomatics at Ryerson University

Ryerson University Geomatics

Ryerson University Geomatics

Location: Toronto, Ontario
Programs: Bachelor of Arts in Geographic Analysis, Post-Graduate GIS Certificates, Master of Spatial Analysis (MSA), Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng.) degree in Civil Engineering (with a Geomatics Engineering option)

Ryerson University located in Toronto, Ontario is probably best known as a public research University. The university is composed of 31,000+ undergraduate students, 2,200+ graduate students, and 65,000+ continuing education students. The institute has built a solid reputation over the years and is well known for the programs that it offers with the majority of them emphasizing applicable hands on skills and training. As a result, Ryerson University has established it self with a reputation for producing career ready graduates ready for the work place.

Ryerson University offers a number of various options to people who want to pursue a Geomatics career with several programs witch we cover here briefly. If you are in the Toronto area and want to study Geomatics then you should contact the web sites and contact people mentioned to find out more information to help aid your decision.

Contact Info: Each program has a different contact person, so click on the program below that you wish to obtain the contact information for:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Geographic Analysis
  • Post-Graduate GIS Certificates
  • Master of Spatial Analysis (MSA)
  • Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng.) degree in Civil Engineering (with a Geomatics Engineering option)

Ryerson University Geomatics

Humber College Online GIS Certificate

Humber College Online GIS Certificate

Humber College Online GIS Certificate

Location: Toronto, Ontario
GIS Programs:  Fundamentals of GIS Certificate

The Fundamentals of GIS Certificate program from Humber College is designed for every day practitioners such as office managers, technical professionals, and or support staff responsible for managing and using GIS data sets.Humber College Online GIS Certificate

It has been designed to appeal to many people from various disciplines such as urban planning, transportation, engineering, natural resources and business industries. 

The program is delivered via online format only so students can be located virtually anywhere in Canada and still upgrade their GIS skills while maintaining an everyday job.

 

Contact Info

205 Humber College Boulevard
Toronto, Ontario
M9W 5L7

ceappliedtech@humber.ca (416) 675-5094


See the Course Web Site for more details.


If you are a student, facility or someone who has any more knowledge, feedback or comments to share about the Humber College GIS program then I encourage you to share them. You can either use the contribute more info form or the comment functionality below.

 

2013 Canadian Institute of Geomatics Conference

Event: 2013 Annual Conference of The Canadian Institute of Geomatics (CIG)
Canadian Institute of Geomatics (CIG)Date:
June 5 to 7, 2013
Location:
Toronto, Ontario
Venue:
Ryerson University

 

Canadian Institute of Geomatics Conference

The Canadian Institute of Geomatics (CIG) is a professional association that represents the interests of the Canadian geomatics community. The CIG recently announced that they will be holding their next annual conference as a joint event shared with the 4th International Conference on Earth Observation for Global Changes. Over the years the CIG has built a solid reputation for hosting great conferences that provide the geomatics community with an open platform where they can exchange ideas or information about research and advancements in the geospatial industry.

Global change is one of the hottest research topics worldwide these days and Earth observation coupled with geomatics has proven to be a very powerful means to help study global changes. CIG conferences provides participants with a professional medium to present some of their ongoing research, projects and ideas relative to global change and earth observations with an emphasis on geospatial information, remote sensing technology, and GNSS. The joint conference will contain several workshops, keynote speakers, panel discussions and technical sessions.

“The conference offers an interdisciplinary forum in the fields of remote sensing and photogrammetry, surveying and mapping, geodesy and geosciences, geography, marine science,forestry, renewable energy, environment, transportation, disaster management, and climate change science.”  [source: Conference Site]

The event will be hosted at Ryerson University in downtown Toronto and take place over three days in June. The last CIG conference was also held in Toronto back in 2007 and was the 100th CIG conference.

Papers and workshop proposals are still being accepted for the conference and all full papers will be published in the conference proceedings. Some papers will be selected, peer-reviewed and also published in a special volume of ‘Springer Lecture Notes’ and future special journal issues.

Conference Web site Links

Conference Site – http://eogc2013.blog.ryerson.ca/
Registration  – http://eogc2013.blog.ryerson.ca/registration/
Program – http://eogc2013.blog.ryerson.ca/program/

DataAppeal Provides Highly Effective & Interactive 3D Maps

logo DataAppealRecently a fairly new mapping tool called DataAppeal was brought to my attention. DataAppeal renders art and design with geo-based data into highly effective and interactive 3D maps. Unlike many other GIS analysis tools on the market this one has been designed to be a simplified easy to use tool so, no previous experience or training is required. Simply upload your data and use DataAppeal to transform rows and rows of boring data into fascinating and beautiful 3D images.

“DataAppeal transforms geo-referenced data by allowing users to generate, render, analyze, and share information through highly effective and visually powerful 3D and animated maps, yet is extremely simple to use. It takes the guess work out of generating information by instantly mapping any uploaded data. “

dataappeal Fiery texture with carpet1. Upload Your Data
– sign up to the free service
– download the basic template file
– add your data to the CSV file
– upload the CSV data set
2. Customize Your Map
– click the icon to import the data from your file into the system (if there are problems with the data then the system will alert you here and you will need to check or reformat your file)
– click the icon to load your data into a default map
– customize the look of your data and map with the various available settings and options
3. Share Your Maps
– Use icons provided to share your maps on Twitter, FaceBook, Email or on your own site or blog
– You can also download a Google Earth file

“We just released an updated version of DataAppeal, with new functionality to make it even easier and much faster to use! We added new features to provide new ways to visualize data sets. You now have the option of layering multiple maps so you can quickly compare different data sets. You can also use the new color gradient feature to quickly see common data points- all on the google earth platform.”

dataappeal tree cover Toronto

All these features will continue to be free for a limited time (in beta mode), so you can see how useful they are when analyzing your data.-we also launched a new website, with 3D data-map image samples and demo videos.

“We would love it if your followers would test it and provide us feedback”

The basic features will remain free always with the more advanced features such as color gradients, texture styles, ability to layer maps and the ability to upload larger data sets will be part of the premium service. So now is a good time to sign up with  DataAppeal and create some 3D interactive maps of your own data, and then share your feedback and experiences with other CanadianGIS.com readers.

Here are sme sample data sets that were rendered through the Dataappeal web-based application showcasing some of the various styles and features available.

Toronto Population- http://dataappeal.com/explore/featured-maps/toronto-population.html

Great Lakes Parks – http://dataappeal.com/explore/featured-maps/great-lakes-parks.html

Free Data Sets for the City of Toronto

The City of Toronto has recently celebrated two years of online Open Data service and they have full intention on continuing to build on that success, by stating that they intend to add more data layers and will further develop their site.

Data sets are provided in various standard downloadable file formats such as XLS, CSV, DGN & SHP. All data set contains basic meta info associated with them such as who created the data, date, format, projection, attributes, contact info etc. The bottom line here is the City of Toronto has granted the GIS community a royalty free, non exclusive licence to use, modify, and distribute any of their data sets that they continue to make available via their data catalogue.

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