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GRASS GIS 7.4.0 released

GRASS GIS 7.4.0 provides more than 480 stability fixes and improvements compared to the previous stable version 7.2. An overview of the new features in the 7.4 release series is available at New Features in GRASS GIS 7.4.

Geospatial Technology – Mapping the Future

Geospatial Technology – Mapping the Future

Geopositioning Promotional Video from Topcon in Europe [source: Vimeo]

Geospatial technology refers to equipment used in visualization, measurement, and analysis of earth’s features, typically involving such systems as GPS (global positioning systems), GIS (geographical information systems), and RS (remote sensing).

Canadian Geospatial Directory

Canadian Geospatial Directory

The Canadian Geospatial Directory contains basic information about the various Geomatics related companies found in and around Canada (with some from abroad) including many key aspects such as the companies basic info, contact info, web site info and geographic location. This section and our website continue to evolve over time as more companies are added.

Canadian Geospatial DirectoryTo find a Canadian geomatics related company listing, simply use the simple search tool (that will allow you to search company names, Cities or postal code) found along the right hand side of the site or select a category from the navigation menu above.

We created the Canadian Geospatial Directory with the hopes that it becomes a comprehensive valuable online resource directory of geospatial related technologies, location-based services, and all geomatics related companies, organizations, education programs,  and location related services in Canada. It uses Google maps to show spatial locations of services (when available) and advanced database search functionality to help people find services in their region.

the Canadian Geospatial DirectoryWe started adding content to the Canadian Geospatial Directory using our own database that contains over 1000 basic entries of various Canadian companies and organizations from coast to coast that work in the geomatics field.

But now it is time for the Canadian Geomatics community to help us further fill out the directory by contributing more information to existing basic listings and adding new listings for companies and services that have yet to be included. We feel this way the geomatics community can all help make the Canadian Geospatial Directory a valuable online go-to resource for anybody to find information about Geospatial companies, organizations and services in Canada.

Basic directory listings in the Canadian Geospatial Directory are free and may include logos, images, details, link to company or service, location etc. Many companies and organizations have more then one location so in order to be better represented on the online maps, multiple entries may be created.

So go ahead and search for your Geospatial related company, organizations or service, then if it has already been included, claim it and make any necessary changes.

If it has not been included yet, then why not take a few moments, add your information and get listed in the  Canadian Geospatial Directory. Simply click here to register for a free user account

Note: a FAQ is being created with answers to common questions about the Canadian Geospatial Directory – however feel free to send us any questions you have

To help fund the project, more comprehensive, “Enhanced” directory submissions are available for a small nominal fee and will provide people the ability to have a more detailed description, more images, videos etc. These listings will also be labeled “Featured” listings and appear at the top of categories and search results and be highly promoted through the Canadian GIS & Geomatics social networks – feel free to contact us for more information about this service.

Top viewed GNSS Receivers

GNSS Receivers

Most viewed GNSS Receivers

Top 5 GNSS receivers on Geo-matching .com (based on user views)

Geo-matching provides a variety of the latest geospatial technical equipment used by professionals in the geomatics sector such as GNSS receivers.

Kronos GNSS systemsThis free online comparison service allows users to compare different geomatics equipment that has been peer reviewed from others in the Geospatial sector, and is a great way to help people decide what hardware they should consider purchasing.

Geo-matching is a product comparison style website for geomatics related devices and provides users with good overviews of total stations, UAVs, GNSS receivers, and other hardware used in the industry. K9-T GNSS

The GNSS category offers a variety of hardware including a variety of models such as the ProPak 6 by NovAtel, T300 by ComNav), APS-NR2 by Altus Positioning, UB370 High Precision, GR-5 by Topcon and the LT400HS by CHC Navigation.

If you have any experience with geomatics related GNSS hardware then you should consider visiting the site and sharing your experiences, so others in the geomatics community can benefit from your input.

The top GNSS receivers based on views from the geospatial community on Geo-matching.com were:

  1.  X91 GNSS – CHC Navigation
  2. V30 – Hi-Target
  3. A30 – FOIF
  4. Zenith 25 – Geomax
  5. R10 – Trimble

However we think that you should keep in mind this top 5 list is based on website views and you should really go to Geo-matching.com yourself, read the available material and user reviews; then decide for yourself which total station is best for you.

Check out some more top 5 lists from Geo-matching.com that feature geospatial technical equipment:

Top 5 Total Stations 

Top 5 UAVs for Mapping and 3D Modelling

Gamma Spectrometers


Geomares PublishingGeo-matching.com is part of Geomares Publishing, a publisher of books, magazines, websites, in topics related to Geomatics & Hydrography.

Geomares Publishing, Nieuwedijk 43, 8531 HK Lemmer, The Netherlands, Phone +31 (0)514 561854, email: info@geomares.nl

QGIS 2 Cookbook

QGIS-2-CookBook

QGIS is a free user friendly open source desktop GIS software package used to create maps and analyze geospatial data. The application supports various formats such as vector, database and raster formats. One major advantage of QGIS is that it allows users to import open street map files that are also gaining popularity every day.

The QGIS 2 Cookbook is a large collection of techniques (simple through to advanced) that are used in everyday geomatics work, with detailed process to help accomplish those tasks using QGIS. By the time you are finished with this book, you should have all the necessary knowledge to better handle and visualize geospatial data,  with QGIS.

Get your copy of the QGIS 2 Cookbook here 

Canadian Geomatics Community Round Table and the Pan-Canadian Geomatics Strategy

[This article was originally written in March 2013, so may look familiar to many, however it has been updated with new information and links, such as details about the upcoming Ottawa workshop in June]

CGCRT and the Pan-Canadian Geomatics Strategy

The phrase Canadian Geomatics Community Round Table (CGCRT) has been spreading throughout the Canadian geomatics community lately and appearing more and more in social media, yet I often get the feeling that not everyone really knows what the CGCRT is, or what they are about. Therefore I prepared this sort introduction with some key links and information in the hopes of helping more people learn more about the CGCRT and hopefully get involved in their initiatives.

It began as an informal gathering of various stakeholders in the Canadian geomatics that came together to discuss changes in the industry  due to improved technological, various social and market conditions and the trend of geographic information appearing more and more in everyday lives.

Canadian Geomatics Community Round Table 2The collaborative group of professionals from all fields of the geomatics sector (geospatial, geographic, location information etc.) representing private industry, academia, professional bodies, nonprofit groups and all levels of government consider the challenges that the geomatics industry may be facing in the upcoming years, propose solutions and strategies that could help guide the direction of the sector and strengthen it for the years to come.

As a support group, it is open to all geomatics professionals who are interested in furthering the future of the field for the betterment of all. A Steering Committee of volunteers from coast to coast was created in 2013 to help guide the Round Table’s initiatives and activities, and to ensure that it stays on track to reach the many goals that the group set.

One of the key concerns highlighted in 2012 was that the rapid development of online mapping applications and location based services was causing an increase in public expectations with regards to the accuracy of geospatial data and therefore a need to strengthen the essentials of the geomatics sector. It was from this that the phrase Canadian Geomatics Round Table (CGCRT) that we all have been hearing and seeing all over the web was created.

The decision to develop a strategy that reflected the general consensus on the part of participants at the 2012 meeting that the geomatics community as a whole would be well-served by a more systematic effort to articulate and promote its shared interests. This Pan-Canadian Geomatics Strategy is an open and collaborative effort started by the CGCRT to create a future ideal with common goals and objectives for everyone working with Canadian geographic information.

Pan-Canadian Geomatics Community Strategy Framework

The idea is to seek, identify and include an ever-widening range of stakeholders in Canada, including industry, academia, governments, non-governmental organizations, geospatial data and service companies, professional associations, individual Canadian citizens, as well as new and emerging players in the sector. Its key objectives include fostering the understanding of the use and value of geographic information to all Canadians, and to ensure that Canada has a healthy geomatics sector that is also productive, competitive and sustainable that will serve Canada well into the future.

While the Pan-Canadian Action Plan provides tactical measures to respond to issues identified by the Round Table, it has also been recognized that there was a need for a broad community strategy to overlay and bind together the tactics of the Action Plan – and to identify other priority areas for action. This will ensure the continued growth of the industry. In fact, it is hoped that it will serve as a buffer for industry professionals today as well as a guide for the practice of geomatics in the future.

The CGCRT has been working on studying the “seven strategy dimensions” used to create the Pan-Canadian Geomatics Strategy and drafting documents to help spur discussion with input to help the strategy development process. The group is also trying to expand and strengthen the geomatics community therefore are seeking the input of everyone involved in the geospatial sector.

The steering committee is now working on organizing the next upcoming national meeting “the Pan-Canadian Geomatics Strategy, Action and Implementation Planning workshop” taking place in Ottawa on June 8th and 9th. If you wish to get involved then contact the CGCRT via email (communications@cgcrt.ca) and follow some of the links below for more CGCRT information.

More Canadian Geomatics Round Table (CGCRT) Information

The CGCRT website is http://cgcrt.ca

[LnGroup id=4824554]

Join the CGCRT on LinkedIn (it is a closed group but requests to join are welcomed so just click the join button above if you are not already a member)

Follow the CGCRT on Twitter

The CGCRT blog contains articles submitted from people coast to coast representing all aspects of the industry and a great place to leave your comments and feedback

Various CGCRT documents  can be found here: http://cgcrt.ca/about-us/background-documents/

For more information on the Pan-Canadian Geomatics Strategy see http://cgcrt.ca/draft-strategy-3/

[Image sources: cgcrt.ca & twitter.com/CanGeoRT/

 


2013 Canadian Institute of Geomatics Conference

Event: 2013 Annual Conference of The Canadian Institute of Geomatics (CIG)
Canadian Institute of Geomatics (CIG)Date:
June 5 to 7, 2013
Location:
Toronto, Ontario
Venue:
Ryerson University

 

Canadian Institute of Geomatics Conference

The Canadian Institute of Geomatics (CIG) is a professional association that represents the interests of the Canadian geomatics community. The CIG recently announced that they will be holding their next annual conference as a joint event shared with the 4th International Conference on Earth Observation for Global Changes. Over the years the CIG has built a solid reputation for hosting great conferences that provide the geomatics community with an open platform where they can exchange ideas or information about research and advancements in the geospatial industry.

Global change is one of the hottest research topics worldwide these days and Earth observation coupled with geomatics has proven to be a very powerful means to help study global changes. CIG conferences provides participants with a professional medium to present some of their ongoing research, projects and ideas relative to global change and earth observations with an emphasis on geospatial information, remote sensing technology, and GNSS. The joint conference will contain several workshops, keynote speakers, panel discussions and technical sessions.

“The conference offers an interdisciplinary forum in the fields of remote sensing and photogrammetry, surveying and mapping, geodesy and geosciences, geography, marine science,forestry, renewable energy, environment, transportation, disaster management, and climate change science.”  [source: Conference Site]

The event will be hosted at Ryerson University in downtown Toronto and take place over three days in June. The last CIG conference was also held in Toronto back in 2007 and was the 100th CIG conference.

Papers and workshop proposals are still being accepted for the conference and all full papers will be published in the conference proceedings. Some papers will be selected, peer-reviewed and also published in a special volume of ‘Springer Lecture Notes’ and future special journal issues.

Conference Web site Links

Conference Site – http://eogc2013.blog.ryerson.ca/
Registration  – http://eogc2013.blog.ryerson.ca/registration/
Program – http://eogc2013.blog.ryerson.ca/program/

Importance of Big Data to Geospatial Technology

Data is becoming increasingly important. But it’s also increasing in size. Remember when a gigabyte seemed like an impossibly large concept? Such is the gargantuan size of the information that is stored and released by defence organisations; they need to be more careful than ever before with regards to how it is managed.

The topic is especially important in relation to armies and defence groups, which will have to guarantee that their statistics are heavily guarded against both online and offline threats.

Importance of Big Data  to  Geospatial Technology

Importance of Big Data  to  Geospatial TechnologyCyber crime is becoming more of a problem for internet users, with hackers developing new skills constantly, making it challenging for particularly sensitive information to be kept away from those who aim to capture it and use it in detrimental ways.

Individual computer users across the world simply need to rely on anti-virus and firewall software to combat cyber threats, but the issue is much more pronounced when it comes to larger organisations, leading to the development of the big data concept.

The phrase refers to assets that increase to an extent where they are awkward to manage using ordinary database management tools, and those in the geospatial technology field will be more than familiar with it.

Deloitte’s Verdict on Big Data

Specialists at Deloitte have commented on how big data is affecting the geospatial technology industry, noting that the services can be highly beneficial. The company claimed that organisations which merge location-aware data with geospatial analysis tools could begin to offer “game-changing support” for business decision making at levels that could never previously have been considered.

Mike Liebhold, senior researcher at the business, said that it is now easy to be excited about the number of developments that are having an impact on geospatial technology.

“Visualization, like many business efforts, should be supported by concrete objectives and well-defined questions that can benefit from geospatial analysis, and tested by those with specific experience in both analyzing and communicating location-aware data.

“Leading organisations that follow these principles to provide geospatial visualization tools to employees, business partners and even customers that allow them to explore, manipulate and act on the insights they gain, will be putting Tobler’s law to use for competitive advantage,” Mr Liebhold noted.

He urged organisations to assess their baseline, investigating existing data sources and analysis tools before comparing these with the capabilities that are necessary for efficient modelling, rendering and interacting.

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Importance of Big Data  to  Geospatial Technology

Big data is a pressing issue for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), and it can sometimes be easy for groups to overestimate the space required to store data. Government Computer News reported that the NGA had not utilized an entire floor of a four-storey technology centre that it began using for the purpose of data storage.

Originally, the NGA planned to use the third and fourth floors, though ultimately just the fourth was necessary. However, it appears that the third floor may actually be put to use, as the organisation has proposed a new military project to address storage needs, according to the news provider.

It expects storage requirements to grow exponentially over the next decade because of planned intelligence collection sensors, which are set to be deployed over the course of the period and increase the use of cloud computing.

New technology for geospatial activities

As time progresses, new innovations are being introduced to the geospatial technology industry, with SpaceCurve existing as one company that is pushing invention in the field. The Seattle-based business has raised $5.2 million (£3.2 million) of funding, following investment from companies such as Reed Elsevier, Divergent Ventures and Triage Ventures.

Gigaom.com has reported that the organisation is aiming to develop a system that is capable of discovering the underlying patterns of multidimensional geodata, rather than working around complexities in data values.

SpaceCurve is hoping that the system will be accessible for anyone who collects information from sensors, mobile devices or location data. Speaking to the news provider, Mr Slitz explained that it has some “major” pilot customers in its plans as it aims to further the technology and open up new possibilities in the market.

How geospatial technology is helping British and American forces

Importance of Big Data  to  Geospatial Technologyhttp://canadiangis.com/data.php

Armies and defence forces will be paying particular attention to the company’s developments, as such organisations will be among those who will gain the most benefit from new geospatial capabilities.

The Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) is one business that has been in close consultation with the US Army Geospatial Center (AGC) recently, with the two parties agreeing a contract to provide geospatial research, intelligence and support.

SAIC is a scientific, engineering and technology applications company that utilises deep domain knowledge to solve issues in national security, energy and environment. The deal has a one-year base period of performance and carries a total value of $200 million when all options are exercised. As a result of the agreement, the AGC will provide war fighters with timely, precise and relevant geospatial information and domain expertise that can be used to support unified land operations.

Various intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) payload systems will be included in the deal, among other innovations. These contain joint capabilities technology demonstrations relevant to GES and command, control, communications, computers (C4) ISR requirements.

John Fratamico, SAIC senior vice president and business unit general manager, said: “We look forward to continuing to provide the AGC with an end-to-end architecture capable of collecting, integrating, synchronising, managing, analysing, displaying, and disseminating geospatial information and C4ISR systems, enabling the AGC to provide direct geospatial support and products to warfighters,”

Britain is another country that is looking to advance its geospatial capabilities, as the country’s Ministry of Defence (MoD) has accepted Roke Manor Research’s Electronic Surveillance and Countermeasures system.

The Electronic Warfare Manpack service will be used as a full core capability in the British Army and Royal Marines. Gavin O’Connell, business development manager at Roke said: “Roke was originally selected to supply EW Manpack equipment in response to the MoD’s Urgent Operational Requirement for its SEER programme in Afghanistan.

“The decision to deploy this system wider and make it a core capability in the British Army and Royal Marines is testament to the advantage that it has been delivering our troops.”


 

Big data and all the topics covered in this article will be under debate at DGI – Europe’s leading geospatial intelligence event, 21-23 January 2013, London.

The DGI Conference & Exhibition brings together heads of defence geospatial intelligence, remote sensing, GIS data & mapping, satellite imagery and analysis within the military, governmental, and geo intelligence sectors. It attracts professionals who are responsible for using, and integrating, geo based capabilities in their operations and organizations. Attended by over 800 Geo professionals, DGI is where the geospatial intelligence community comes together.

To join them, and to find out more ,visit DGIeurope.com or check back to CanadianGIS.com for more DGI Conference & Exhibition updates.

[Paper submitted & published on behalf of DGI]

 

Do DigitalGlobe and GeoEye Complete each other?

Do DigitalGlobe and GeoEye Complete each other?

Yes. At least that’s what Walter Scott, founder of DigitalGlobe, thinks about the companies’ proposed merger. OK, the combined entity will be known as DigitalGlobe, but while this looks on the face of it to be a thinly veiled buyout, title aside this cannot be much farther from the truth. If one actually looks at the various terms of the deal and its benefits to the companies, it is increasingly looking like GeoEye is the missing piece in DigitalGlobe’s puzzle.

DigitalGlobe and GeoEyeWhile there is no doubt that the merger will certainly help the companies in many ways, one cannot but help wonder if the deal got its final push after the US National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) elected to cut GeoEye’s share of a 10-year contract vehicle called EnhancedView, Oh, and DigitalGlobe’s part of the contract has been left intact. The terms of the deal and how it affects the companies will be discussed later, but first the benefits.

There is no doubt that combining the synergies of the two companies will certainly open up new revenue streams for each while also bolstering their offerings. One very important advantage is that while both the companies rely on the US government for 60% of their revenues, the combined entity will draw only around 50% of its revenues from the US government, helping the companies diversify their revenue streams. DigitalGlobe’s Scott expects the merged company to be able to manage its total satellite constellation more efficiently, while also taking advantage of the capabilities of each of the sensors. To quote Scott, “…in some aspects 1+1 is more than 2.”

There are other advantages available to the combined entity as mentioned by GeoEye CEO Matt O’Connell was the satellite imagery business outside the US, while also allowing it to compete with other collection methods, such as aerial imagery collected from UAVs. Scott even added that the deal enables the companies to be in a better position to compete against foreign government-subsidised systems like France’s Astrium.

Now coming back to the contract, GeoEye is currently negotiating conditions of NGA’s remaining $70 million in cost-share payments related to the GeoEye-2 satellite scheduled for launch in early 2013. The NGA has proposed to renew EnhancedView for just three months starting in September, with a nine-month option to be exercised subject to the availability of funds. The deal would see NGA pay GeoEye $39.75 million over the three months beginning September 1, and an additional $119.25 million over the following nine months if funds are available.

The original contract would have paid GeoEye $12.5 million per month from NGA until GeoEye-2 was deemed fully operational around September 2013, following which the monthly payment amount would increase to $27.8 million. The modified contract calls for $70 million in co-payments for GeoEye-2’s construction to be linked to a new series of milestones that GeoEye is fine with.

According to GeoEye CFO Joseph Greeves, the GeoEye-2 construction is still expected to cost between $820 million and $850 million including launch and insurance, with GeoEye having committed $718 million to the project so far. The problem here is that the NGA had previously told GeoEye that the agency may not be able to follow up on its earlier commitment that it would pay $337 million in GeoEye- 2 costs as it was no longer viable, adding that the $181.2 million already approved would probably be the final payment.

While O’Connell expects the final 2013 budget to take “months,” House and Senate are set to put in place a “Continuing Resolution” temporary spending measure to fund the US government at 2012 levels through March 2013. However, O’Connell expects a six-month Continuing Resolution to have “unknown consequences” on the EnhancedView budget. It would be interesting to see how the outcomes of the NGA deal and the proposed M&A deal with DigitalGlobe impact GeoEye, given that GeoEye is continuing to compete with DigitalGlobe on other projects such as the NGA’s GeoInt Data Services business, a five-year contract vehicle for which GeoEye is bidding as part of a team of other contractors.

However, GeoEye is not entirely at the receiving end of the deal as its projects such as its exclusive relationship that provides Google with the “all GeoEye-1 imagery in the Internet search engine space for the next several years,” will continue after the merger along with all other GeoEye contracts.

In spite of all these pros and cons, the deal still has to get many approvals, not the least from the companies’ shareholders, not to mention that of the regulators. But if it does go ahead, will the whole be greater than the sum of its parts?  Sadly, geospatial intelligence may have come along way, but it still can’t predict the future, so only time will tell…


 

Meet DigitalGlobe and GeoEye at DGI – Europe’s leading geospatial intelligence event, 21-23 January 2013, London.

The DGI Conference & Exhibition brings together heads of defence geospatial intelligence, remote sensing, GIS data & mapping, satellite imagery and analysis within the military, governmental, and geo intelligence sectors. It attracts professionals who are responsible for using, and integrating, geo based capabilities in their operations and organizations. Attended by over 800 Geo professionals, DGI is where the geospatial intelligence community comes together.

To join them, and to find out more ,visit DGIeurope.com or check back to CanadianGIS.com for more DGI Conference & Exhibition updates.

[Paper submitted & published on behalf of DGI]

GeoAlberta – Ga3 – Geospatial: anywhere, anytime for anyone!

GeoAlberta – Ga3 – Geospatial – anywhere, anytime for anyone

Date: May 7-9, 2012GeoAlberta - Ga3 - Geospatial - anywhere, anytime for anyone
Location: Coast Plaza Hotel – Calgary, Alberta
Registration: registration@geoalberta.com or see the registration page

Details: GeoAlberta has become the Premier Geospatial Information Conference for Geomatics professionals in Western Canada. This years event titled “Ga3 – Geospatial – anywhere, anytime for anyone!” will be the 10th Anniversary and planned to reflect the new Geomatics world around us.

“Geospatial information has become part of everyday life and is a growing world wide phenomenon. No longer is Geospatial Information the preserve of highly skilled professionals, instead many people in society use it on a daily basis, sometimes unknowinly.

Real-time, interactive and mobile GPS/GIS technologies has created new real-time geographic analysis and real-time geography. Such developments have led to advances in the ways spatial information is collected, mapped and used by an expanding user community. They are now at the heart of a vast array of real-time interactive mobile computing, geolocation applications and asset management, along with wireless geographic services that are revolutionizing the role of geography and geospatial information in everyday society.

Discover how it all works together from traditional mapping and survey technology to new web technologies and smart devices. Learn from industry leaders how geospatial information is emerging, evolving and imminent in today’s society.”

The 10th GeoAlberta Conference will be titled “Geospatial – anywhere, anytime for anyone” to reflect the changes in how Geospatial Information is used and how it is available all the time. It is expected that close to 450 professionals will come together in Calgary this May to discuss Geospatial Information, celebrate and explore new opportunites. The event is made possible thanks to combined efforts of four Western Geomatics associations: the Alberta Geomatics Group, GeoEdmonton, Geospatial Information & Technology Association (GITA) Alberta Chapter and Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA) Alberta Chapter.

Registration begins in February with members of the four Western Geomatics associations mentioned above able to save up to $200 if they register before the early bird deadline and speakers and presenters can save up to half of their registration fees.

They are also promoting Cartography contest where schools can submit maps that they have generated for a chance to win money. The competition is open to students or in Grade 9 thru 12. The top maps will be exhibited at the GeoAlberta conference with chances to win up to $1000.

Help celebrate GeoAlberta’s 10th Anniversary by attending or presenting at this years GeoAlberta – Geospatial Information Conference in Calgary. For more information, direct requests to info@geoalberta.com or check out the conference web site for updates.

[source: GeoAlberta.com]


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