NSCC Obtains a Bathymetric LIDAR To Unlock the Mysteries Off Nova Scotia’s Shores

Middleton, NS – Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC) will become the only college in Canada with a research bathymetric Laser Imaging Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) device that can unlock the mysteries off Nova Scotia’s shores thanks to the support of a national innovation award and industry partners.

bathymetric LIDAR The Honourable Gary Goodyear, Minister of State (Science and Technology), announced today that the government will invest $798,906 through the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) in a research project that will capture the treasure trove of information that exists in the shallow waters off Nova Scotia’s coastline — known as the “white ribbon gap” due to the challenges of mapping this area.

“The possibilities are as vast as the waters we will be charting,” says NSCC research scientist and PhD in Earth Sciences Tim Webster. “Our team will be able to map seabed topography by air, unearthing a wealth of data to support initiatives in areas including sustainable harvesting practices, aquatic vegetation health, wave predictions to better define storm surge detail, and nautical hazards plotting.”

Industry partners investing in the research project, including McGregor GeoScience Ltd., Acadian Seaplants Limited, Leading Edge Geomatics, GeoNet Technologies Inc. and Nova Scotia Power Inc., are relying on the project’s equipment and research to be of benefit to their specific business needs.

“Acadian Seaplants’ stewardship of the rockweed fishery will advance even further because we will use the latest imaging technology and high-tech software to identify, much faster, where the rockweed is and how much is there,” says Acadian Seaplants Limited, Vice-President of Research, Alan Critchley.“NSCC’s expertise and new technologies will augment our sustainable resource management practices and enable the adoption of the most advanced scientific tools to safeguard the marine resource.”

The project scope includes the purchase of a new laser system, two new GPS receivers, a boat and extra staffing support. The bathymetric LIDAR equipment is able to measure the subsurface topography in oceans, rivers and lakes, offering a safe, cost-effective and efficient means of collecting data in difficult-to-access areas.

This bathymetric LIDAR is unique in that it can be mounted in an aircraft to look down into the water or can be turned sideways and mounted on a boat to measure the detail of the coastline. Repeat surveys can accurately measure erosion after storms or provide important information to infrastructure projects along the coastline, such as cable landing sites.

The award is part of a $12.5-million funding announcement for applied research and business innovation from the foundation’s College Industry-Innovation Fund.

“Canadian colleges are an important player in our national innovation ecosystem,” says Gilles G. Patry, president and CEO of the CFI. “The team at NSCC is showing what colleges can achieve when they have the state-of-the-art research infrastructure they need to conduct top level applied research.”

About CFI
The Canada Foundation for Innovation gives researchers the tools they need to think big and innovate. By investing in state-of-the-art facilities and equipment in Canada’s universities, colleges, research hospitals and non-profit research institutions, the CFI is helping to attract and retain the world’s top talent, to train the next generation of researchers, to support private-sector innovation and to create high-quality jobs that strengthen the economy and improve the quality of life for all Canadians. For more information, visit innovation.ca.

About NSCC
NSCC is committed to building Nova Scotia’s economy and quality of life through education and innovation. Serving the province through a network of 13 campuses, NSCC offers over 100 programs in five academic schools. These programs reflect the labour market needs and opportunities of the provincial economy and set graduates on a course for career success. According to NSCC’s 2012 Graduate Follow-up Study, 86% of NSCC graduates are employed, most in their field of choice. Of those, 94% live and work in Nova Scotia. For more information about NSCC, go to www.nscc.ca.

[images source: agrg.cogs.nscc.ca]

Ontario Medical Association turns to DMTI Spatial

OMA Turns to DMTI to Develop Province-Wide Routing Table for Physician Incentive Research

By: Phil Kaszuba, Vice President & General Manager, DMTI Spatial

The Ontario Medical Association (OMA) needed to build a province-wide database to perform multiple pieces of analysis regarding all doctors and facilities in Ontario. This initiative was partially driven by the needs of various incentive programs that use a “rurality index” that measures where doctors were located in relation to the population and health centres. Driven by a federal mandate handed out to all provincial medical associations, the OMA needed an effective way to assess access to care in rural areas of the province, in order to then place doctors closer to their patients and facilities.

Phil Kaszuba, Vice President & General Manager, DMTI Spatial

The OMA approached DMTI as they had previously established a strong relationship with them to obtain data such as Postal Boundaries. Not only was DMTI up to the challenge of helping the OMA with this project, but their Professional Services Department was able to develop a new custom algorithm to complete the routing in a time previously believed impossible. As a final product, DMTI delivered a reliable, centralized database in the form of two routing tables.

The first table provided the shortest driving distance between any two postal codes in the province. The second provided the shortest total time between any of these same points. These tables consisted of over 142 billion records, the largest data delivery in DMTI’s 18+ years, and one of the largest in GIS history. This centralized database will allow the OMA to perform numerous economic analyses, including meeting the federal mandate of determining appropriate physician incentives in rural areas.

The full case study can be found at: http://bit.ly/Wecupa

[source: email from DMTI Spatial]

International Women’s Day March 8th: Issues & Leadership in the Canadian Geomatics Community

GoGeomatics Canada is focusing on women in the Canadian geomatics community during the month of March.  In honor of International Women’s Day on March 8th GoGeomatics Magazine will feature interviews and articles by women about women in our field.  Some contributors from last year will be coming back to share their thoughts on current issues relating to employment and leadership in geomatics, as well many new voices will be heard.

GoGeomatics Canada Women with globe for International Women’s Day March 8th

International Women’s Day has a very real meaning.  In Canada and much of the western world it is often taken for granted the equal status that women hold in our society.  However this is not the case in many other places around the world where women can face discrimination from the establishment and even within their own families. In many places they are taught by society, from day one, that they are inferior to men.

By sharing various stories and points of views from women in the Canadian geomatics community GoGeomatics aims to show that they are present and well accounted for in all areas of our society especially in the technical fields.  As well by talking to women who are leaders in geomatics we let the world know that women in Canada are taking on challenges and issues of great importance.

Our month long focus is also a reminder that women matter to society. That they have the right to be heard, despite what governments, society, or families tell them in other parts of the world.  GoGeomatics Canada believes that to remember and honor all the ways women make a difference in our community helps those who may yet struggle to reach the same level of acceptance and stature.

GoGeomatics hopes that you will join the Canadian geomatics community during the month of March by reading and engaging in the discussions that arise as we talk to other women in Canada about geomatics and their leadership in our community.

If you have a story or a point of view that you would like to share with the geomatics community in Canada please contact Deanna the  GoGeomatics Community Manager.

DMTI Spatial chosen as provider of geospatial data to the Federal Government

DMTI Spatial chosen due to high quality and comprehensiveness of its location-based data

 

 

DMTI Spatial Inc. (DMTI), Canada’s leading provider of Location Intelligence solutions, announced today that it has been awarded the Domestic Vector Data Set contract by Public Works and Government Service Canada (PWGSC).  The initial one year contract includes an option for the Government of Canada to extend the term by up to four additional one year periods, for a total potential value of $2.9 million.  They were awarded the contract after an extensive competitive procurement process and evaluation period, and was chosen due to the high quality of its CanMap® geospatial datasets.DMTI Spatial

This contract provides various federal government departments with critical location-based information to help make important policy and planning decisions affecting the lives of all Canadians.  Departments initially using DMTI’s data under this contract include the Department of National Defence, Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency.  DMTI’s data has been of assistance to numerous government initiatives in the past, including supporting the operations of the 2010 Vancouver Olympics and the 2010 G20 and G8 Summits in Muskoka and Toronto.

“This major contract win demonstrates confidence in our data from the highest levels of government,” said John Fisher, DMTI Spatial Chairman and CEO.  “DMTI’s data has proven to be of tremendous value to the government of Canada in the past and we are pleased to continue to support their needs on making key decisions.  This selection in the Federal Government’s competitive process underscores DMTI Spatial’s leadership role in Location Intelligence solutions.”

About DMTI Spatial Inc. 
DMTI has been providing industry-leading enterprise Location Economics solutions for almost two decades to Global 2000 companies and government agencies.  DMTI’s world-class Location Hub platform enables real-time decisions by uniquely identifying, validating, analyzing and maintaining a universe of location-based data.  Through a strong partner ecosystem, DMTI enables its customers to use location as a frame of reference to enrich customer, prospect, vendor and infrastructure insight with a wide variety of attributes to better identify risk and opportunity.

Memorial (MUN) GISciences Diploma Program

Memorial University of Newfoundland GISciences Diploma Program

Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN)

Location: St. John’s, Newfoundland
Program: GISciences Diploma Program

MUN GISciences Diploma Program

The diploma program in Geographic Information Sciences (GISciences) at Memorial is an intense 30 credit program offered to students that are currently registered in a Bachelor of Arts or in a Bachelor of Science Degree (Also can be offered to students whom have already completed a degree at another recognized university (see their web site for more details) .

The program is made up of a from a variety of cartography, geographical information systems, and remote sensing courses along with two field courses that help provide students with real world opportunities to apply skills and knowledge learned in class.

Students will learn to compile geo-referenced databases, design and produce maps, analyze data in geographic information system environments, produce digital elevation models, and extract information from aerial photographs and satellite images.

GISciences Diploma Program - 1919 Geological Map of Newfoundland

Graduates leave the GISciences program understanding and appreciating how cartography, geographic information systems and remote sensing are integrated with one another into the field of Geomatics.

Contact Info

Department of Geography
Memorial University
St. John’s Newfoundland
A1B 3X9
geog@mun.ca (709) 864-7417

See the Course Web Site for more details.

[source: mun.ca ]


If you are a student, facility or someone who has any more knowledge, feedback or comments to share about the GIS program at Memorial University of Newfoundland then I encourage you to share it . You can either use the contribute more info form or the comment functionality below.

Pacific Alliance Technologies Reinforces Their High Level Professional Team

Reinforcing their high level professional team with Shawn McLeod and Steven Eder joining Pacific Alliance Technologies in Vancouver.  Shawn McLeod has joined their team as a Director of Services, he has a Bachelor of Geography in Spatial Sciences and is a Certified GIS Professional.

Shawn has extensive experience in GIS and Asset Management.  He spent the last 13 years as the GIS Manager with the District of North Vancouver and 5 years prior to that as a Technologist within that organization.  He built a progressive GIS Dept for them and earned them 5 awards in leadership, innovation, and excellence in IT including the prestigious United Nations Sasakawa Award for Disaster Risk Reduction, the UBCM Leadership in Innovation Award for Technology and the 2009 Esri Award of Excellence.

Steven Eder joined Pacific Alliance Technologies as an Account Manager.

Steven has 25 years of experience in technical sales environments with SAP (formerly Business Objects / Crystal Decisions) and Xerox.  He is a graduate of the University of Waterloo in Sciences and Geography, and has a passion for mapping.  With a ‘customer first’ approach to business, Steven will provide PAT customers with innovative, customized solutions that will streamline your GIS and Mapping processes and reduce the costs of running your GIS department.  Renowned as a champion of his customer’s interests, Steven will ensure that your project is successful.logo iVault

Pacific Alliance Technologies (PAT) is a leading provider of GIS, web-based mapping, architectural, and engineering software, specializing in the customization, implementation, training and support of these solutions. The company’s mission is to develop and implement GIS and Asset Management solutions that will help sharpen your competitive edge; enhance strategic planning and decision making; and increase your organization’s productivity.

iVAULT is PAT’s web-based mapping solution that allows organizations to easily benefit from linking their existing data to a location. iVAULT is compatible with leading technologies: ArcGIS, MapGuide and Google. iVAULT is also integrated with our StarDyne sister companies’ software: Diamond, WorkTech, Vadim, Tempest – along with other leading financial and asset management software products. With iVAULT you can find, report-on and analyze your assets in the context of the neighboring historical and as-built information along with data from any of your business systems.

As an Autodesk® Value Added Reseller and Premier Solutions Provider, Pacific Alliance has helped hundreds of firms throughout Western Canada implement and train their staff on Autodesk CAD, GIS, and AEC solutions, such as AutoCAD, Map 3D, MapGuide Enterprise, Civil 3D, AutoCAD Architecture and the full Revit product line – Architecture, Structure and MEP.

Contact:

Pacific Alliance Technologies
24 East 4th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5T 1E8
www.pat.ca
ivault.pat.ca

[Press Release submitted via email and published with permission from PAT]

Looking for all COGS graduates

Attn: COGS Alumni Network

Bob Maher has begun to research ‘the story of COGS’, a personal project for Bob and his wife, Heather who arrived in Lawrencetown, Nova Scotia back in 1980 when he joined Bruce Peveril to teach the first Advanced Diploma program in Scientific Computer Programming.

COGS NSCC logoOver the next six years, the ‘survey school’ known as the Nova Scotia Land Survey Institute (NSLSI) was transformed into the College of Geographic Sciences. It was a time of creativity and innovation in technical education with new programs in Business Computer programming, Computer Graphics and GIS to complement the Remote Sensing program. NSLSI was officially renamed COGS (as most people know it) in 1986.

As background research, Bob and Heather have started to interview staff who remember those years of transition. In addition, they are compiling class lists, by program and by year. This has led to the concept of a COGS Alumni Network.

Are you a COGS graduate ?

One of primary outcomes of any learning institution are its graduates. One can compile the view from the teachers’ perspective but this may be quite different than the students’ perspective. Using social media, Bob and Heather want to reach out to the COGS alumni community. We are interested in photographs, articles, stories and feedback on this project.

You can connect directly at either maher.rv@gmail.com or heather.maxine@gmail.com or through http://www.thestoryofcogs.ca (started but expected to expand further over xmas) – a new web site where anyone can track the project

Regards;

Bob Maher and Heather Stewart

 

Note: See Full Memo at  http://www.thestoryofcogs.ca/cogs-alumni-network

[Notice republished with on behalf of B. Maher & thestoryofCOGS.ca]

No Expensive Development Needed: Configure your Web GIS

What: Free 30-minute webinar about Web GIS through the iVAULT Administrator Module
When: Thursday, November 29, 2012 10:00 AM – 10:30 AM PST

Plan to attend a free 30-minute webinar where you can learn how easily your organization can configure a Web GIS Portal without any additional development cost. iVAULT is a self-service Web GIS application that can help you make better, more informed decisions for your organization. Without any consultancy services, a Web GIS can be configured by your organization through the iVAULT Administrator Module.

Enhance security, increase analytics capabilities and personalization and integrate with third party involvement by:

• Managing role-based access for user groups and configure access to specific attributes, map layers and reports for each group
• Configuring your brand, site layout, task panel, languages, tool bars, and database searches
• Connecting to Bing, Google, Yahoo, Open StreetMap, Esri and other base map services
• Setting up detailed database searches and enable application-level integrations

 

Do you want to learn more?  Register now and don’t miss this opportunity. To find out more and register see https://www4.gotomeeting.com/register/884235279 or visit iVAULT Website for additional information: http://ivault.pat.ca

 

Importance of Big Data to Geospatial Technology

Data is becoming increasingly important. But it’s also increasing in size. Remember when a gigabyte seemed like an impossibly large concept? Such is the gargantuan size of the information that is stored and released by defence organisations; they need to be more careful than ever before with regards to how it is managed.

The topic is especially important in relation to armies and defence groups, which will have to guarantee that their statistics are heavily guarded against both online and offline threats.

Importance of Big Data  to  Geospatial Technology

Importance of Big Data  to  Geospatial TechnologyCyber crime is becoming more of a problem for internet users, with hackers developing new skills constantly, making it challenging for particularly sensitive information to be kept away from those who aim to capture it and use it in detrimental ways.

Individual computer users across the world simply need to rely on anti-virus and firewall software to combat cyber threats, but the issue is much more pronounced when it comes to larger organisations, leading to the development of the big data concept.

The phrase refers to assets that increase to an extent where they are awkward to manage using ordinary database management tools, and those in the geospatial technology field will be more than familiar with it.

Deloitte’s Verdict on Big Data

Specialists at Deloitte have commented on how big data is affecting the geospatial technology industry, noting that the services can be highly beneficial. The company claimed that organisations which merge location-aware data with geospatial analysis tools could begin to offer “game-changing support” for business decision making at levels that could never previously have been considered.

Mike Liebhold, senior researcher at the business, said that it is now easy to be excited about the number of developments that are having an impact on geospatial technology.

“Visualization, like many business efforts, should be supported by concrete objectives and well-defined questions that can benefit from geospatial analysis, and tested by those with specific experience in both analyzing and communicating location-aware data.

“Leading organisations that follow these principles to provide geospatial visualization tools to employees, business partners and even customers that allow them to explore, manipulate and act on the insights they gain, will be putting Tobler’s law to use for competitive advantage,” Mr Liebhold noted.

He urged organisations to assess their baseline, investigating existing data sources and analysis tools before comparing these with the capabilities that are necessary for efficient modelling, rendering and interacting.

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Importance of Big Data  to  Geospatial Technology

Big data is a pressing issue for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), and it can sometimes be easy for groups to overestimate the space required to store data. Government Computer News reported that the NGA had not utilized an entire floor of a four-storey technology centre that it began using for the purpose of data storage.

Originally, the NGA planned to use the third and fourth floors, though ultimately just the fourth was necessary. However, it appears that the third floor may actually be put to use, as the organisation has proposed a new military project to address storage needs, according to the news provider.

It expects storage requirements to grow exponentially over the next decade because of planned intelligence collection sensors, which are set to be deployed over the course of the period and increase the use of cloud computing.

New technology for geospatial activities

As time progresses, new innovations are being introduced to the geospatial technology industry, with SpaceCurve existing as one company that is pushing invention in the field. The Seattle-based business has raised $5.2 million (£3.2 million) of funding, following investment from companies such as Reed Elsevier, Divergent Ventures and Triage Ventures.

Gigaom.com has reported that the organisation is aiming to develop a system that is capable of discovering the underlying patterns of multidimensional geodata, rather than working around complexities in data values.

SpaceCurve is hoping that the system will be accessible for anyone who collects information from sensors, mobile devices or location data. Speaking to the news provider, Mr Slitz explained that it has some “major” pilot customers in its plans as it aims to further the technology and open up new possibilities in the market.

How geospatial technology is helping British and American forces

Importance of Big Data  to  Geospatial Technologyhttp://canadiangis.com/data.php

Armies and defence forces will be paying particular attention to the company’s developments, as such organisations will be among those who will gain the most benefit from new geospatial capabilities.

The Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) is one business that has been in close consultation with the US Army Geospatial Center (AGC) recently, with the two parties agreeing a contract to provide geospatial research, intelligence and support.

SAIC is a scientific, engineering and technology applications company that utilises deep domain knowledge to solve issues in national security, energy and environment. The deal has a one-year base period of performance and carries a total value of $200 million when all options are exercised. As a result of the agreement, the AGC will provide war fighters with timely, precise and relevant geospatial information and domain expertise that can be used to support unified land operations.

Various intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) payload systems will be included in the deal, among other innovations. These contain joint capabilities technology demonstrations relevant to GES and command, control, communications, computers (C4) ISR requirements.

John Fratamico, SAIC senior vice president and business unit general manager, said: “We look forward to continuing to provide the AGC with an end-to-end architecture capable of collecting, integrating, synchronising, managing, analysing, displaying, and disseminating geospatial information and C4ISR systems, enabling the AGC to provide direct geospatial support and products to warfighters,”

Britain is another country that is looking to advance its geospatial capabilities, as the country’s Ministry of Defence (MoD) has accepted Roke Manor Research’s Electronic Surveillance and Countermeasures system.

The Electronic Warfare Manpack service will be used as a full core capability in the British Army and Royal Marines. Gavin O’Connell, business development manager at Roke said: “Roke was originally selected to supply EW Manpack equipment in response to the MoD’s Urgent Operational Requirement for its SEER programme in Afghanistan.

“The decision to deploy this system wider and make it a core capability in the British Army and Royal Marines is testament to the advantage that it has been delivering our troops.”


 

Big data and all the topics covered in this article will be under debate at DGI – Europe’s leading geospatial intelligence event, 21-23 January 2013, London.

The DGI Conference & Exhibition brings together heads of defence geospatial intelligence, remote sensing, GIS data & mapping, satellite imagery and analysis within the military, governmental, and geo intelligence sectors. It attracts professionals who are responsible for using, and integrating, geo based capabilities in their operations and organizations. Attended by over 800 Geo professionals, DGI is where the geospatial intelligence community comes together.

To join them, and to find out more ,visit DGIeurope.com or check back to CanadianGIS.com for more DGI Conference & Exhibition updates.

[Paper submitted & published on behalf of DGI]

 

Do DigitalGlobe and GeoEye Complete each other?

Do DigitalGlobe and GeoEye Complete each other?

Yes. At least that’s what Walter Scott, founder of DigitalGlobe, thinks about the companies’ proposed merger. OK, the combined entity will be known as DigitalGlobe, but while this looks on the face of it to be a thinly veiled buyout, title aside this cannot be much farther from the truth. If one actually looks at the various terms of the deal and its benefits to the companies, it is increasingly looking like GeoEye is the missing piece in DigitalGlobe’s puzzle.

DigitalGlobe and GeoEyeWhile there is no doubt that the merger will certainly help the companies in many ways, one cannot but help wonder if the deal got its final push after the US National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) elected to cut GeoEye’s share of a 10-year contract vehicle called EnhancedView, Oh, and DigitalGlobe’s part of the contract has been left intact. The terms of the deal and how it affects the companies will be discussed later, but first the benefits.

There is no doubt that combining the synergies of the two companies will certainly open up new revenue streams for each while also bolstering their offerings. One very important advantage is that while both the companies rely on the US government for 60% of their revenues, the combined entity will draw only around 50% of its revenues from the US government, helping the companies diversify their revenue streams. DigitalGlobe’s Scott expects the merged company to be able to manage its total satellite constellation more efficiently, while also taking advantage of the capabilities of each of the sensors. To quote Scott, “…in some aspects 1+1 is more than 2.”

There are other advantages available to the combined entity as mentioned by GeoEye CEO Matt O’Connell was the satellite imagery business outside the US, while also allowing it to compete with other collection methods, such as aerial imagery collected from UAVs. Scott even added that the deal enables the companies to be in a better position to compete against foreign government-subsidised systems like France’s Astrium.

Now coming back to the contract, GeoEye is currently negotiating conditions of NGA’s remaining $70 million in cost-share payments related to the GeoEye-2 satellite scheduled for launch in early 2013. The NGA has proposed to renew EnhancedView for just three months starting in September, with a nine-month option to be exercised subject to the availability of funds. The deal would see NGA pay GeoEye $39.75 million over the three months beginning September 1, and an additional $119.25 million over the following nine months if funds are available.

The original contract would have paid GeoEye $12.5 million per month from NGA until GeoEye-2 was deemed fully operational around September 2013, following which the monthly payment amount would increase to $27.8 million. The modified contract calls for $70 million in co-payments for GeoEye-2’s construction to be linked to a new series of milestones that GeoEye is fine with.

According to GeoEye CFO Joseph Greeves, the GeoEye-2 construction is still expected to cost between $820 million and $850 million including launch and insurance, with GeoEye having committed $718 million to the project so far. The problem here is that the NGA had previously told GeoEye that the agency may not be able to follow up on its earlier commitment that it would pay $337 million in GeoEye- 2 costs as it was no longer viable, adding that the $181.2 million already approved would probably be the final payment.

While O’Connell expects the final 2013 budget to take “months,” House and Senate are set to put in place a “Continuing Resolution” temporary spending measure to fund the US government at 2012 levels through March 2013. However, O’Connell expects a six-month Continuing Resolution to have “unknown consequences” on the EnhancedView budget. It would be interesting to see how the outcomes of the NGA deal and the proposed M&A deal with DigitalGlobe impact GeoEye, given that GeoEye is continuing to compete with DigitalGlobe on other projects such as the NGA’s GeoInt Data Services business, a five-year contract vehicle for which GeoEye is bidding as part of a team of other contractors.

However, GeoEye is not entirely at the receiving end of the deal as its projects such as its exclusive relationship that provides Google with the “all GeoEye-1 imagery in the Internet search engine space for the next several years,” will continue after the merger along with all other GeoEye contracts.

In spite of all these pros and cons, the deal still has to get many approvals, not the least from the companies’ shareholders, not to mention that of the regulators. But if it does go ahead, will the whole be greater than the sum of its parts?  Sadly, geospatial intelligence may have come along way, but it still can’t predict the future, so only time will tell…


 

Meet DigitalGlobe and GeoEye at DGI – Europe’s leading geospatial intelligence event, 21-23 January 2013, London.

The DGI Conference & Exhibition brings together heads of defence geospatial intelligence, remote sensing, GIS data & mapping, satellite imagery and analysis within the military, governmental, and geo intelligence sectors. It attracts professionals who are responsible for using, and integrating, geo based capabilities in their operations and organizations. Attended by over 800 Geo professionals, DGI is where the geospatial intelligence community comes together.

To join them, and to find out more ,visit DGIeurope.com or check back to CanadianGIS.com for more DGI Conference & Exhibition updates.

[Paper submitted & published on behalf of DGI]