RADARSAT Data and Mosaics

Canada’s first Earth observation satellite, was declared non-operational earlier this year. RADARSAT 2 launched in 2007 was designed to replace RADARSAT 1 and is used for a variety of applications such as sea ice mapping, ship detection, agricultural monitoring, pollution detection, geological mapping, land use mapping, and much more.

Here are links to several RADARSAT data and mosaic images that you can download completely free.

Prince Edward Island Atlas

Comprehensive overview of geographic information featuring the province of Prince Edward Island, download the 100 page full color PEI Road Atlas free …

Nova Scotia Open Data Portal

Recently Nova Scotia joined the growing number of Canadian Provinces and Municipalities that offer open data, when it officially launched the Nova Scotia open data portal providing public access to more than 135 different data sets

Open Data is about drawing on the collective knowledge and innovation of Nova Scotians to help grow our economy and improve the lives of those around us …

OpenStreetMap Step by Step User Guides

OpenStreetMap User GuideOpenStreetMap User Guide

If you have been following our OpenStreetMap topic over the past few months then I am sure you have come to the realize that it is a community driven project and that anyone can edit OpenStreetMaps. But where does one start?

Below are some resource documents to help you get started using OpenStreetMap created by LearnOSM. These documents provide easy to understand, step-by-step guides that will explain how you can start contributing to OpenStreetMap and using OpenStreetMap data in your projects.

The beginner guide provides step by step instructions to help users get started with OpenStreetMap. It teaches how to create a free account, how to use the map editing tools, and how to collect information to create custom maps with.

OpenStreetMap Beginner Guide

  1. Introduction to OSMOpenStreetMap User Guide
  2. Starting OSM
  3. Editing with Potlatch
  4. Getting Started with JOSM
  5. JOSM Plug ins
  6. Using the GPS
  7. GPS: extrex20
  8. Walking Papers
  9. Editing with JOSM
  10. Imagery Offset
  11. Moving Forward

OpenStreetMap Intermediate Guid

The openstreetmap Intermediate Guide concentrates more on the details of editing and validating as well as shortcuts and ways that people can contribute to the openstreetmap community.

  1. Editing in Detail
  2. Conflict Resolution
  3. Using Orbview Imagery in JOSM
  4. Quality Assurance
  5. Tasking Manager
  6. Editing the Wiki
  7. Creating Custom Presets
  8. Private Data Store

The openstreetmap Advanced Guide is intended for users who have some experience with openstreetmap and have already covered the topics found in the Beginner and Intermediate guides.

 

OpenStreetMap Advanced GuideEditing your maps - OpenStreetMap User Guide

  1. PostGIS Configuration
  2. Cartography with TileMill
  3. Putting Maps on a Website
  4. Github Sharing
  5. WMS Service Configuration
  6. Private Data Storage Configuration
  7. Projections and File Types
  8. SQLite Databases
  9. Virtual Machine Setup

 


East Hants Open Data

East Hants, Nova Scotia, Canada is a vibrant municipality between Metro Halifax and the Bay of Fundy. East Hants uses GIS technology in all their departments, from sewer, water, and road projects, to regional planning, taxation, and municipal elections. Recently they developed an online portal (Interactive East Hants) to help Nova Scotian’s explore their growing Municipality’s geospatial data sets.

OpenStreetMap – the Power of the People

What is OpenStreetMap?

OpenStreetMapWith two technology giants Apple and Google fighting out each other for claiming the top position in mapping technologies, a silent challenger has rapidly approached the top position without too much hassle.

OpenStreetMap launched 10 years ago with the slogan of Free Wiki World Map has taken developers and map lovers by surprise, providing editable map data, making it easier for people to interact and navigate.

Even though the competition has already previously mapped every inch of the globe, their restrictions on availability combined with complexity in rendering of information and lack of detail in many regions has made people to start using OpenStreetMap as an alternative.

OpenStreetMap started in the UK back in 2004 and is still largely dominated by European input, however North America use has grown over the past few years with the help of many organizations such as Esri who has included OpenStreetMap  as one of their free base map layers.  Since OpenStreetMap is a crowd sourced application, its future depends highly on its ability to attract more active users.

So to help celebrate 10 years of OpenStreetMap we have created a series of articles dedicated to open source mapping and web applications that have been either built with or that make use of OpenStreetMap.

Also check out some of these OpenStreetMap & Open Data related Topics:

Canada Lands Digital Cadastral Data & Mapping Applications

Download Canada Lands Digital Cadastral Data

Canada Lands digital cadastral data is used to define internal and external boundaries of Canada Lands. Canada Lands are any federal Crown lands belonging to the Crown, that are situated in Yukon, the Northwest Territories, Nunavut or in any National Park or Indian Reserve, as defined by the Indian Act. For more specific info about check out Canada Lands see Surveys, Parcel and Tenure on Canada Lands by Dr. Brian Ballantyne.

Digital cadastral data of Canada Lands depicting the internal and external boundaries is managed by Natural Resources Canada, and is made available for public use in a variety of formats. Several pre-made mapping products related to Canada Lands are available, a Canada Lands Google Earth file, and Canada Lands digital cadastral data in CAD or GIS formats. Pre-made maps are provided in PDF format at National and regional scales.

Links to download Canada Lands digital cadastral datasets:

Canada Lands Mapping Applications

The Canada Lands overlay in Google Earth KMZ format, is a handy file providing information for boundaries and parcels of National Parks, Indian Reserves, National Parks and the territories and links to digital cadastral datasets and survey plans and related maps. The KMZ file is dynamic so only needs to be downloaded once, and automatically updates via the internet.

The Canada Lands Survey System online map browser is another application by Natural Resources Canada created to help locate digital cadastral datasets and survey plans of Canada Lands. The search tools included are great for finding survey plans and related maps related to internal and external boundaries of Canada Lands.

 


Nova Scotia Online Maps & Mapping Resources

Data is a vital role in geomatics related projects and for many years we have been helping people find Canadian data resources. Here you will find a large list of Nova Scotia Mapping Resources …

How to use OpenSteetMaps

How to use OpenSteetMap?

Free OpenStreetMap User GuideFor people exploring various places in the neighborhood, it is similar maps as other online map information with zoom and pan, but the real power of OpenStreetMap rests in the hands of developers who can access all the data behind the maps for customizing to their own. What it means that, with OpenStreetMap, you can not only view various spatial locations, but add also your own custom locations and information  to the database which can then be used by other users. All you need to do is to query the map database in any one of various possible ways, thereby extracting information which can later be used to create custom maps. The output of a database query is an XML file with various description of information about local areas, directions, routes, etc. Using all this information, it will be easier to create custom based maps.

With over a million contributors, most of them use GPS units in performing ground surveys. On collecting the data, the information needs to be uploaded into the system using the project website. Once the data is added, they need to be edited to make it user friendly and at this point, all the above mentioned software plays the role. Even though GPS units are needed to add a data for the first time, the subsequent editions of data do not require any additional hardware, making it possible for anyone who have the local knowledge to update the information. The majority of the new information has been added by dedicated contributors while millions of other users simply update the maps. For users who wish to view the map tiles, they can do so with the help of web browsers, GNOME maps and Marble. The only requirement for adding data to the maps is to sign up for a free account.

Data Formats:

OpenStreetMap represents physical structures in the ground using tags that are attached to various data structures such as nodes, ways and relations. Nodes are simply the coordinates of the geographic position which represent the exact location. They use both latitude and longitude values for data representation. A collection of nodes can be called as ways which represent various polygonal areas such as streets and roads, parks and lakes, etc. Relations are the combination of both nodes and ways which can represent restriction present in roads, various ways for a route etc. All the above said information are stored in the map in the form of tags. Any attribute present in the map can be tagged for information, thereby helping anyone wanting information. Considering all the factors, OpenStreetMap was already popular, but is gaining even more popularity everyday with number of contributors growing to new heights. All the information provided in this article gives you an overview of what is OpenStreetMap, but there are lots to explore with respect to its features and supplements.

And if you are more interested about this wonderful mapping experience, don’t miss out attending the annual conference of the OSM community named, State of Map Conference. All new ideas related to the maps are discussed here, along with launching updates and new contents.

Also check out some of these OpenStreetMap & Open Data related Topics:


Success Recipe of OpenStreetMap

There are various reasons for the success of OpenStreetMap and the major one is the granularity that it provides with respect to information and analysis. Since OpenStreetMap is a crowd-sourced map, it shows information at a granular level, thus helping all services and businesses in reaching out to people.

Success Recipe of OpenStreetMap

Moreover, since OpenStreetMap is open to anyone for editing and updating their location, all information is updated as and when changes happen. This makes it possible to find any place, anywhere across the globe. One major factor helping the maps evolve is the locale of the developers and their intimacy to the area they live. Since all information about location is updated by the locals themselves, the details are accurate, clear and precise.OpenStreetMap Toronto

The second major reason for the success of OpenStreetMap is the flexibility it offers to both the developers and common people in rendering and finding information. For example, Google controls whatever you do with Google Maps and therefore it can restrict any information it considers as inappropriate, even though the information may be from legitimate sources. This is where OpenStreetMap has tasted success over the years.

There is complete flexibility in the way information is shared and updated in the maps, thereby giving you full access and control to show whatever you want. Moreover, with OpenStreetMap, developers can build custom based maps, making it reflect the theme of business. Even though this flexibility may cost, vandalism of the system, no major reports have been filed till date.

So even though there are a couple of cons, using the maps, the advantages overrun the drawbacks. Also, the fact that all the services offered by OpenStreetMap are free of cost as everyone of you using the maps is considered the owners of the maps, you need not spend any bucks to showcase your location.

But don’t just take our words for it, if you really love mapping then you should be checking out OpenStreetMap for yourself. After all it is free so you have nothing to lose and so much to gain … http://www.openstreetmap.org is the official OpenStreetMap  website.

Also check out some of these OpenStreetMap & Open Data related Topics: